Interview Tip #1

Very important - research the company! Nothing hurts my feelings more than when someone barely knows about the company they’ve applied to.

A person doesn’t need a plethora of info on where they’re working, but even knowing some info about a companies history, or mission/values, can show you’ve put some effort into getting to know the company you want to work for.

cracked:

Ssh ssh ssh ssh…..context would ruin it.

Not purchasing this film at all right now…

cracked:

Ssh ssh ssh ssh…..context would ruin it.

Not purchasing this film at all right now…

Remember, no human condition is ever permanent. Then you will not be overjoyed in good fortune nor too scornful in misfortune. — Socrates (via itsquoted)

Couldn’t have said it better

(via thehandsomestbob)

communitynbc:

tessarion:

S05E01 | Repilot

Nailed it, Britta.

utnereader:

The Struggle for the Soul of Ben & Jerry’s
In this story, the good guys and the bad guys are not always where you might expect them to be. For example, Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield are widely known in business as pioneers of social responsibility. But the people who wrote the sale agreements that preserved Ben & Jerry’s as a socially responsible business were elite corporate lawyers, about as far from Vermont hippies as you can get. Several Unilever executives have become so enthusiastic about the drive for linked prosperity that they have said and done risky things to promote it. And the social mission’s most steadfast champion—the only person who consistently fought for it at every stage of the story—describes himself as an activist first, and adds that he has little interest in being a business executive.
Jeff Furman’s coworkers often describe him as “the ampersand in Ben & Jerry’s.” He became friends with Ben and Jerry years before they scooped their first cone. He helped them write the company’s first business plan in 1977 by borrowing a similar plan from a pizza joint and substituting the word “cone” whenever that plan used the word “slice.”
Keep reading …

utnereader:

The Struggle for the Soul of Ben & Jerry’s

In this story, the good guys and the bad guys are not always where you might expect them to be. For example, Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield are widely known in business as pioneers of social responsibility. But the people who wrote the sale agreements that preserved Ben & Jerry’s as a socially responsible business were elite corporate lawyers, about as far from Vermont hippies as you can get. Several Unilever executives have become so enthusiastic about the drive for linked prosperity that they have said and done risky things to promote it. And the social mission’s most steadfast champion—the only person who consistently fought for it at every stage of the story—describes himself as an activist first, and adds that he has little interest in being a business executive.

Jeff Furman’s coworkers often describe him as “the ampersand in Ben & Jerry’s.” He became friends with Ben and Jerry years before they scooped their first cone. He helped them write the company’s first business plan in 1977 by borrowing a similar plan from a pizza joint and substituting the word “cone” whenever that plan used the word “slice.”

Keep reading …

gq:

"Monetary success is not success. Career success is not success. Life, someone that loves you, giving to others, doing something that makes you feel complete and full. That is success." - James Avery

gq:

"Monetary success is not success. Career success is not success. Life, someone that loves you, giving to others, doing something that makes you feel complete and full. That is success." - James Avery

theatlantic:

What Does It Take to Get Kids to Stop Skipping School?

When it comes to tackling the problem of chronic absenteeism, students who already already have a track record of skipping class can be a particularly tough crowd to sway. But a new report out of New York City—where one out of every five students missed a month or more of school last year — suggests an intensive community-wide initiative is gaining ground.
First, some background: chronic absenteeism is defined as missing at least 10 percent of the instructional days over the course of an academic year, which amounts to about 18 days in the average district. The national advocacy group 
Attendance Works considers chronic absenteeism as an early warning system that too many schools, parents and students are failing to heed.
Read more. [Image: Conspirator/flickr]

theatlantic:

What Does It Take to Get Kids to Stop Skipping School?

When it comes to tackling the problem of chronic absenteeism, students who already already have a track record of skipping class can be a particularly tough crowd to sway. But a new report out of New York City—where one out of every five students missed a month or more of school last year — suggests an intensive community-wide initiative is gaining ground.

First, some background: chronic absenteeism is defined as missing at least 10 percent of the instructional days over the course of an academic year, which amounts to about 18 days in the average district. The national advocacy group 

Attendance Works considers chronic absenteeism as an early warning system that too many schools, parents and students are failing to heed.

Read more. [Image: Conspirator/flickr]

People do not seem to realize that their opinion of the world is also a confession of character. — Ralph Waldo Emerson (via itsquoted)